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free Z39.50 implementations page -- who knows one?

the LOC Z39.50 Software page has been up a long time, but is probably ready for someone to do a comparison. can anyone recommend any of these tools (at least one is under GPL)? i'd love to be able to plug MARC.pm onto ZETA, for instance, and pull data out for Jake... anyone tried something similar?

SIXPACK-0.99

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as seen at freshmeat, and at SIXPACK site: "SIXPACK is a free BibTeX and Reference Manager designed to edit, convert and manage reference files, search and sort bibliographies, import and export many different bibliography types. Sixpack uses the excelent perl package bp by Dana Jacobson to covert between formats." and it reads/writes bibtex, refer, endnote, tip, procite, rfc1807, and plain text along with one-way for several others. written in perl/tk... looks real good.

M[n]M-1.a

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Stuart writes: "M[n]M is software that
supports processing of national standard MARC MeSH subject authority records for use in medical library online public access catalogs. While designed for use with Innopac M[n]M can also be used to manage MARC MeSH in other OPACs. M[n]M is freely available under the GNU Public License. To download M[n]M or to read more, go to library.med.nyu.edu/mm".

There's also a very informative paper describing M[n]M available here.

pybliographer-0.9.7.1

as seen on gnome-list, what's new includes "multiple documents interface, with copy/paste and drag'n'drop; multiple selections (useful with LyX citation for example); all the supported formats (bibtex, medline, ovid, refer) can now be read and written; better date handling; bug fixes." for more see the pybliographer download page at gnome.org. if you haven't tried this yet give it a shot; i might finally get rid of endnote + msword (and there was much rejoicing). :)

XMLMARC-1.0

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seen on many lists recently is XMLMARC, a "Java client/server program [which] converts MARC to XML based on flexible maps and simplified, yet detailed DTDs for bibliographic and authorities formats." Its license is free for non-commercial use but requires consent for redistribution, and their broader experiment is described here. They seem to be aware of MARC.pm... it would be great to see a side-by-side feature comparison of the two.

Pybliographer-0.9.8

As seen at freshmeat, gnome-list, and noted by Matt W.: "Many annoying bugfixes, a graphical configuration mechanism, and an XML-based style format for bibliographic outputs." Go to www.gnome.org/pybliographer (note new url) for more.

Pybliographer-0.9.9

as seen at gnome.org: "This version is only a minor bug-fixes release." Btw I've been using this a bit and I'm getting ready to let go of Endnote for good. Wooh-hooh... :)

Pybliographer-0.9.10

from gnome-list: "endnote generated bibtex files should now be readable; additional configuration topics for bibtex; minor bug fixes" ...and from the pybliographer site: "Consider this version as a 1.0pre1, so please report any problem you encounter with it." Frederic is really doing great work on this... it's got every feature I need now. Wooh-hooh!

Pybliographer-0.9.11

news from Frederic, via www.gnome.org/pybliographer: "we are now at 0.9.11, aka 1.0pre2. Improved bibtex author formatting and fixed compilation problems with i18n support. I'll be on vacation two weeks, and plan to release 1.0 when I come back, depending on the number of bug reports I'll find in my mailbox ;-)"

has anybody looked into plugging these classes into Zope yet?

CDS/ISIS: tell us more

I've now seen CDS/ISIS and its variants mentioned in several places and am still confused about what it is but here's a brief description nonetheless. from the UNESCO ISIS page: Micro CDS/ISIS is an advanced non-numerical information storage and retrieval software developed by UNESCO since 1985 to satisfy the need expressed by many institutions, especially in developing countries, to be able to streamline their information processing activities by using modern (and relatively inexpensive) technologies. The software was originally based on the Mainframe version of CDS/ISIS, started in the late '60s, thus taking advantage of several years of experience acquired in database management software development." take 2, from the CDS-ISIS user forum site: "Mini/Micro CDS/ISIS is a text retrieval program, designed and distributed free of charge by UNESCO. It is widely used for bibliographic (and other) databases throughout the world, and especially in developing countries." If I understand all this properly, it is basically a non-relational database environment commonly used by libraries and other largely nonprofits (20,000+ of 'em) throughout the world. I pulled down the unix version but can't quite make heads or tails of it. Somebody please explain more... update: collected comments from all who offered are available here.